Comparison of Virtual Reality Based Therapy With Customized Vestibular Physical Therapy for the Treatment of Vestibular Disorders

Alahmari, Khalid A. and Sparto, Patrick J. and Marchetti, Gregory F. and Redfern, Mark S. and Furman, Joseph M. and Whitney, Susan L. (2014) Comparison of Virtual Reality Based Therapy With Customized Vestibular Physical Therapy for the Treatment of Vestibular Disorders. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING, 22 (2). pp. 389-399. ISSN 1534-4320

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Abstract

We examined outcomes in persons with vestibular disorders after receiving virtual reality based therapy (VRBT) or customized vestibular physical therapy (PT) as an intervention for habituation of dizziness symptoms. Twenty subjects with vestibular disorders received VRBT and 18 received PT. During the VRBT intervention, subjects walked on a treadmill within an immersive virtual grocery store environment, for six sessions approximately one week apart. The PT intervention consisted of gaze stabilization, standing balance and walking exercises individually tailored to each subject. Before, one week after, and at six months after the intervention, subjects completed self-report and balance performance measures. Before and after each VRBT session, subjects also reported symptoms of nausea, headache, dizziness, and visual blurring. In both groups, significant improvements were noted on the majority of self-report and performance measures one week after the intervention. Subjects maintained improvements on self report and performance measures at six months follow up. There were not between group differences. Nausea, headache, dizziness and visual blurring increased significantly during the VRBT sessions, but overallsymptoms were reduced at the end of the six-week intervention. While this study did not find a difference in outcomes between PT and VRBT, the mechanism by which subjects with chronic dizziness demonstrated improvement in dizziness and balance function may be different.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Rehabilitation science
Divisions: College of Applied Medical Sciences > Rehabilitation science
Depositing User: Dr. Khalid Alahmari
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2017 06:45
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2017 06:45
URI: http://eprints.kku.edu.sa/id/eprint/510

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